Fancywork


In the 19th Century, the term "fancywork" applied to a variety of items involving needlework, especially those related to the art of sewing. I create a number of these items using patterns from the period as well as some original designs from my imagination. This is also where I display some of my creations that aren't dolls, but which I've had great fun creating.

For my additional Fancywork offerings, please go to:

VELVET STRAWBERRY MAKE-DO STORY & PATTERN BOOK




This is the second in my series of doll stories and sewing instructions in a little 1830-style book.

The Velvet Strawberry: The Story of a Doll's Little Make-Do & Instructions on How to Make It is 5.5 by 8 inches and 16 pages long.

It tells a brief story about how a little make-do strawberry came into being, along with instructions and simple patterns.

$16 each, includes postage.

Click here to purchase.




PINCUSHION DOLL STORY & PATTERN BOOK







Here is my first in a series of doll stories and sewing instructions contained in a little vintage-style book.

Eliza Sewie ~ The Story of a Pincushion Doll & Instructions on How to Make Her is 5.5 by 8 inches and 26 pages long.

It tells a brief story about Eliza Sewie and has detailed instructions on how to make this little pincushion doll. Plus, the book contains photos of the two pages of the actual 1831 American Girl's Book where Eliza Leslie introduced her "Common Linen Doll" that was my inspiration for Eliza Sewie.

I'm working on other doll story-and-instruction books you'll see here in the coming months.

$16 each, includes postage.

MAGGIE PAPER-DOLL CARD



This is one of my little "slip-ins," named because I slip them into packages to my customers. The little doll is about 3.5 inches tall. Print the doll onto card stock, using this PDF:

Cut out the doll and her Kinsale cape. Attach a small, folded piece of card stock to the back of her skirt to act as a stand and as a notecard. Attach the folded card to the back of the doll using Scotch double-stick foam tape, available at any hardware or craft store.


SEW AN ELIZA LESLIE HEART PINCUSHION




For Valentine's Day 2006, Early American Life magazine asked me to share instructions for sewing a heart-shaped pincushion, based on Eliza Leslie's American Girl's Book from 1831. With these instructions you can re-create this charming early American hanging pincushion.

Note: In cutting the fabric into a "half handkerchief," be sure the pieces are triangular, as if the handkerchief were folded diagonally.


PRIMS FEATURES QUEEN ANNE PANSY POPPET PATTERN



Prims magazine ~ one of the most popular publications for the "primitive" look ~ featured Christine's Queen Anne Pansy Poppet in its Fall, 2010, issue, complete with patterns for creating your own rendition of this well-liked doll.

Here is the complete text and pattern for the Poppet as it appeared in Prims.

SEW YOUR OWN QUEEN ANNE POPPET DOLL




Early American Life magazine a few years ago asked me to design an early American style doll that readers could sew and enjoy. The result was this Queen Anne "poppet" doll. Over the years, I've used this flexible pattern to develop several treatments, from a child's toy to even a poppet witch.

Here is the complete text and pattern of the original Poppet as it appeared in Early American Life. Feel free to use the pattern to develop your own fun rendition of the Poppet.